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posted 2017-11-07 07:00:21 +0300

It is hoped it does not "improve" into the Play Store where there are a lot of applications, but most of them are interested in serving you advertising or stealing your data. It would be preferable to yes, have paid applications, but a smaller number of high-quality applications instead of a cesspool filled with get-rich-quick attempts by 15-year-olds making fart apps.

What is it lacking for in apps? Applications of real utility or convenience such as banking applications or transportation apps are at the mercy of the firms that hold that data: banks will be interested in security and thus will want to write the application themselves, while transportation firms will require having the data publicly accessible in a usable format. Telecommunications services management applications will be somewhere in between these two requirements

On the games front, well, there is a native Gameboy emulator so there you go, thousands of games are available.

Things like Whatsapp and Skype and other social communication applications require cooperation from their respective owners of the services (again, a downfall of non-libre software platforms) and thus "improving" the Jolla application shop won't do any good.

The intrinsic motivation for app development is already here: Sailfish user has a problem and has the programming skill and thus solves the problem with their skills and usually does a very good job, and that is the beauty of the current store: most applications are either well/decently written and feedback is taken into consideration in the hopes of the utility of the application being the end result and not being on the front page of the Daily Mail with the title "This 14 year-old-girl owns three Ferraris thanks to a five-minute programming course!".

If you move to extrinsic motivation, also known as "money" there is a drive to be the first to create garbage like "I am rich" kind of useless applications and other rubbish. I would rather not have to sift through applications that are there not to solve an issue or provide utility but whose main purpose is to make the developer money.

With that said, I agree that developers should be rewarded for their work, but once you make a store where the reward is money you end up with those driven to it with number over their eyes and not the ultimate purpose of mobile applications which is to add utility and convenience to the mobile device. Jamming the device full of adverts and stuffing the data connection with telemetry data does not in my opinion add to the utility or convenience of the mobile device in the vast majority of cases.

This is the difficult question of how to feed developers, but not incentivise greed.

So, probably no, it won't "improve" in the sense of being more like the Play Store and thank goodness for that. It is already a much better experience.

Maybe you can explain what applications you want and then the community can either point you in the correct direction or think up something?

It is hoped it does not "improve" into the Play Store where there are a lot of applications, but most of them are interested in serving you advertising or stealing your data. It would be preferable to yes, have paid applications, but a smaller number of high-quality applications instead of a cesspool filled with get-rich-quick attempts by 15-year-olds making fart apps.

What is it lacking for in apps? Applications of real utility or convenience such as banking applications or transportation apps are at the mercy of the firms that hold that data: banks will (or "may", depending on the bank) be interested in security and thus will want to write the application themselves, while transportation firms will require having the data publicly accessible in a usable format. Telecommunications services management applications will be somewhere in between these two requirements

On the games front, well, there is a native Gameboy emulator so there you go, thousands of games are available.

Things like Whatsapp and Skype and other social communication applications require cooperation from their respective owners of the services (again, a downfall of non-libre software platforms) and thus "improving" the Jolla application shop won't do any good.

The intrinsic motivation for app development is already here: Sailfish user has a problem and has the programming skill and thus solves the problem with their skills and usually does a very good job, and that is the beauty of the current store: most applications are either well/decently written and feedback is taken into consideration in the hopes of the utility of the application being the end result and not being on the front page of the Daily Mail with the title "This 14 year-old-girl owns three Ferraris thanks to a five-minute programming course!".

If you move to extrinsic motivation, also known as "money" there is a drive to be the first to create garbage like "I am rich" kind of useless applications and other rubbish. I would rather not have to sift through applications that are there not to solve an issue or provide utility but whose main purpose is to make the developer money.

With that said, I agree that developers should be rewarded for their work, but once you make a store where the reward is money you end up with those driven to it with number over their eyes and not the ultimate purpose of mobile applications which is to add utility and convenience to the mobile device. Jamming the device full of adverts and stuffing the data connection with telemetry data does not in my opinion add to the utility or convenience of the mobile device in the vast majority of cases.

This is the difficult question of how to feed developers, but not incentivise greed.

So, probably no, it won't "improve" in the sense of being more like the Play Store and thank goodness for that. It is already a much better experience.

Maybe you can explain what applications you want and then the community can either point you in the correct direction or think up something?

It is hoped it does not "improve" into the Play Store where there are a lot of applications, but most of them are interested in serving you advertising or stealing your data. It would be preferable to yes, have paid applications, but a smaller number of high-quality applications instead of a cesspool filled with get-rich-quick attempts by 15-year-olds making fart apps.

What is it lacking for in apps? Applications of real utility or convenience such as banking applications or transportation apps are at the mercy of the firms that hold that data: banks will (or "may", depending on the bank) be interested in security and thus will want to write the application themselves, while transportation firms will require having the data publicly accessible in a usable format. Telecommunications services management applications will be somewhere in between these two requirements

On the games front, well, there is a native Gameboy emulator so there you go, thousands of games are available.

Things like Whatsapp and Skype and other social communication applications require cooperation from their respective owners of the services (again, a downfall of non-libre software platforms) and thus "improving" the Jolla application shop won't do any good.

The intrinsic motivation for app development is already here: Sailfish user has a problem and has the programming skill and thus solves the problem with their skills and usually does a very good job, and that is the beauty of the current store: most applications are either well/decently written and feedback is taken into consideration in the hopes of the utility of the application being the end result and not being on the front page of the Daily Mail with the title "This 14 year-old-girl owns three Ferraris thanks to a five-minute programming course!".

If you move to extrinsic motivation, also known as "money" there is a drive to be the first to create garbage like "I am rich" kind of useless applications and other rubbish. I would rather not have to sift through applications that are there not to solve an issue or provide utility but whose main purpose is to make the developer money.

With that said, I agree that developers should be rewarded for their work, but work. However, once you make a store where the reward is money you end up with those driven to it with number numbers over their eyes and not the ultimate purpose of mobile applications which is to add utility and convenience to the mobile device. Jamming the device full of adverts and stuffing the data connection with telemetry data does not in my opinion add to the utility or convenience of the mobile device in the vast majority of cases.

This is the difficult question of how to feed developers, but not incentivise greed.

The best approach to have more applications would probably be to get more users onto Sailfish OS, which would drive demand for Sailfish OS applications, and with demand would come the supply. Simple economics!

So, probably no, it won't "improve" in the sense of being more like the Play Store and thank goodness for that. It is already a much better experience.

Maybe you can explain what applications you want and then the community can either point you in the correct direction or think up something?