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posted 2018-01-14 18:28:32 +0200

For me, the notion of being locked into an OS because of an app ecosystem is one I reject. There are no apps that Android or iOS provide (and Sailfish doesn't) that I require for daily use. If something doesn't exist outright, then it is almost guaranteed to exist in standard Linux software, warehouse repos, github, or (worst case) using an Android app via Alien Dalvik. Sailfish OS costs money primarily because of the technologies Jolla has to license from third parties. Jolla has to pay for Microsoft Exchange support, Alien Dalvik and the XT9 predictive text solution. It only makes sense to pass that expense to customers. Jolla is a very small non-mainstream mobile OS provider, and they can't afford to develop, support and improve a system without monetary support. Google and Apple can afford to give their OSes away because the prices are already rolled into the cost of handsets.

Now, as for the pros of Sailfish (and how I justify the small cost):

  • Sailfish OS is not a product of a US firm, and has no special agreements with US firms. As such, it is not subjected to the usual CIA/NSA disclosure agreements. While it is certainly not immune from some of the same attack vectors shown in Vault 7/8, Jolla doesn't directly subvert its customer base by kowtowing to CIA/NSA interests.
  • Jolla actually patches CVEs, rather than leaving them open to be exploited. Android is so fragmented that the likelihood of getting an update that addresses issues - without purchasing the latest flagship device every six months - is slim to none. Apple frequently abandons devices and products in their planned obsolescence scheme, which makes update schedules dubious - at best. At worst, you'll never get an update to address monumentally bad implementations, like KRACK on older AirPort express stations.
  • Sailfish OS and Jolla have a very good privacy policy, and do not farm your data for ad revenue or other nefarious purposes.
  • Sailfish OS is a traditional Linux, mostly open with the exception of a few device drivers, some parts of the UX, and third-party licensed components like Microsoft Exchange support and Alien Dalvik. As such, I am not limited to Jolla's perception of usability. If I want to write a bash script to disable the ofono MMS context during certain hours, I can. If I want to nullroute specific netblocks so that my phone can't connect to them, I can. All without "rooting" or circumventing even the most basic security measures. I can even compile software on my handset if I so choose.
  • Sailfish OS is a lot leaner than Android or iOS, and doesn't rely on constantly running background processes doing who knows what with your data. As such, my monthly data usage is minimal compared to what it was on Android or iOS. Furthermore, my battery on my Sailfish X lasts almost a week, where I'd have to charge the same phone daily with the same usage on Android. It does what I want it to when I want it to.
  • Sailfish OS has an intuitive UI that's much more comprehensive and usable with one hand, especially in cold climates where gloves are required. Using Android and iOS is clumsy by comparison.
  • Jolla focuses on only a handful of devices, at least attempting to maximize their performance and usability.
  • The community, both TJC and TMO, are some of the best examples of dedication and

As for the cons?:

  • Jolla doesn't have a "matured" app repository with 7,000 different fart apps.

For me, the notion of being locked into an OS because of an app ecosystem is one I reject. There are no apps that Android or iOS provide (and Sailfish doesn't) that I require for daily use. If something doesn't exist outright, then it is almost guaranteed to exist in standard Linux software, warehouse repos, github, or (worst case) using an Android app via Alien Dalvik. Sailfish OS costs money primarily because of the technologies Jolla has to license from third parties. Jolla has to pay for Microsoft Exchange support, Alien Dalvik and the XT9 predictive text solution. It only makes sense to pass that expense to customers. Jolla is a very small non-mainstream mobile OS provider, and they can't afford to develop, support and improve a system without monetary support. Google and Apple can afford to give their OSes away because the prices are already rolled into the cost of handsets.

Now, as for the pros of Sailfish (and how I justify the small cost):

  • Sailfish OS is not a product of a US firm, and has no special agreements with US firms. As such, it is not subjected to the usual CIA/NSA disclosure agreements. While it is certainly not immune from some of the same attack vectors shown in Vault 7/8, Jolla doesn't directly subvert its customer base by kowtowing to CIA/NSA interests.
  • Jolla actually patches CVEs, rather than leaving them open to be exploited. Android is so fragmented that the likelihood of getting an update that addresses issues - without purchasing the latest flagship device every six months - is slim to none. Apple frequently abandons devices and products in their planned obsolescence scheme, which makes update schedules dubious - at best. At worst, you'll never get an update to address monumentally bad implementations, like KRACK on older AirPort express stations.
  • Sailfish OS and Jolla have a very good privacy policy, and do not farm your data for ad revenue or other nefarious purposes.
  • Sailfish OS is a traditional Linux, mostly open with the exception of a few device drivers, some parts of the UX, and third-party licensed components like Microsoft Exchange support and Alien Dalvik. As such, I am not limited to Jolla's perception of usability. If I want to write a bash script to disable the ofono MMS context during certain hours, I can. If I want to nullroute specific netblocks so that my phone can't connect to them, I can. All without "rooting" or circumventing even the most basic security measures. I can even compile software on my handset if I so choose.
  • Sailfish OS is a lot leaner than Android or iOS, and doesn't rely on constantly running background processes doing who knows what with your data. As such, my monthly data usage is minimal compared to what it was on Android or iOS. Furthermore, my battery on my Sailfish X lasts almost a week, where I'd have to charge the same phone daily with the same usage on Android. It does what I want it to when I want it to.
  • Sailfish OS has an intuitive UI that's much more comprehensive and usable with one hand, especially in cold climates where gloves are required. Using Android and iOS is clumsy by comparison.
  • Jolla focuses on only a handful of devices, at least attempting to maximize their performance and usability.
  • The community, both TJC and TMO, are some of the best examples of dedication and on the planet. I've yet to run into an issue (that wasn't already addressed or solved in mainstream Linux forums) that wasn't addressed or fixed by the community.

As for the cons?:

  • Jolla doesn't have a "matured" app repository with 7,000 different fart apps.

For me, the notion of being locked into an OS because of an app ecosystem is one I reject. There are no apps that Android or iOS provide (and Sailfish doesn't) that I require for daily use. If something doesn't exist outright, then it is almost guaranteed to exist in standard Linux software, warehouse repos, github, or (worst case) using an Android app via Alien Dalvik. Sailfish OS costs money primarily because of the technologies Jolla has to license from third parties. Jolla has to pay for Microsoft Exchange support, Alien Dalvik and the XT9 predictive text solution. It only makes sense to pass that expense to customers. Jolla is a very small non-mainstream mobile OS provider, and they can't afford to develop, support and improve a system without monetary support. Google and Apple can afford to give their OSes away because the prices are already rolled into the cost of handsets.

Now, as for the pros of Sailfish (and how I justify the small cost):

  • Sailfish OS is not a product of a US firm, and has no special agreements with US firms. As such, it is not subjected to the usual CIA/NSA disclosure agreements. While it is certainly not immune from some of the same attack vectors shown in Vault 7/8, Jolla doesn't directly subvert its customer base by kowtowing to CIA/NSA interests.
  • Jolla actually patches CVEs, rather than leaving them open to be exploited. Android is so fragmented that the likelihood of getting an update that addresses issues - without purchasing the latest flagship device every six months - is slim to none. Apple frequently abandons devices and products in their planned obsolescence scheme, which makes update schedules dubious - at best. At worst, you'll never get an update to address monumentally bad implementations, like KRACK on older AirPort express stations.
  • Sailfish OS and Jolla have a very good privacy policy, and do not farm your data for ad revenue or other nefarious purposes.
  • Sailfish OS is a traditional Linux, mostly open with the exception of a few device drivers, some parts of the UX, and third-party licensed components like Microsoft Exchange support and Alien Dalvik. As such, I am not limited to Jolla's perception of usability. If I want to write a bash script to disable the ofono MMS context during certain hours, I can. If I want to nullroute specific netblocks so that my phone can't connect to them, I can. All without "rooting" or circumventing even the most basic security measures. I can even compile software on my handset if I so choose.
  • Sailfish OS is a lot leaner than Android or iOS, and doesn't rely on constantly running background processes doing who knows what with your data. As such, my monthly data usage is minimal compared to what it was on Android or iOS. Furthermore, my battery on my Sailfish X lasts almost a week, where I'd have to charge the same phone daily with the same usage on Android. It does what I want it to when I want it to.
  • Sailfish OS has an intuitive UI that's much more comprehensive and usable with one hand, especially in cold climates where gloves are required. Using Android and iOS is clumsy by comparison.
  • Jolla focuses on only a handful of devices, at least attempting to maximize their performance and usability.
  • The community, both TJC and TMO, are some of the best examples of dedication on the planet. I've yet to run into an issue (that wasn't already addressed or solved in mainstream Linux forums) that wasn't addressed or fixed by the community.

As for the cons?:

  • Jolla doesn't have a "matured" app repository with 7,000 different fart apps.